A Westmont man was sentenced Friday to 2½ to five years in county prison for secretly videotaping and recording three teen girls with a “spy camera” while they showered and used his bathroom.

Judge Gerard Long also ordered Thomas C. Hull to pay fines totaling $3,800 and to have counseling, at his family’s expense, while he’s in jail. Hull also will be on probation for 14½ years.

Hull will not be paroled until his psychiatrist determines he’s unlikely to become a repeat offender, Long said.

Prosecutors will have the opportunity to review that finding and challenge it before Hull’s release, the judge said.

The victims, in letters read to Long, said their lives had been impacted forever.

“I feel paranoid, and know that I can’t trust men. I don’t feel very safe unless I’m in my own home,” one girl said.

Another girl said that, when she learned about the camera, she “did want to kill myself, but I didn’t have a weapon.” Since then, she said she had changed her mind, but added, “I hate all men.”

The girls said they don’t feel safe in using public restrooms or dressing rooms. They said Hull should be kept in jail for a long time.

“I don’t think I’ll ever forget this. He has really destroyed my life, and he deserves the same,” the one teen said.

Hull, 38, formerly of the 100 block of Tioga Street, had pleaded guilty in May to 29 criminal offenses, including sex abuse of children by the videotaping at his home. He also had pleaded no contest to indecent assault and unlawful contact in the series of incidents over several months.

Hull, a former air traffic controller at the Johnstown-Cambria County Municipal Airport, had no prior record and is “remorseful for what he did,” said his attorney, Robert Davis Gleason.

“He lost his home, his employment, his future, his family and his reputation. He’s a ruined man, family-wise and financial-wise,” Gleason said.

Hull told the judge that what he’d done stemmed from “an extreme mental breakdown” coming as his marriage was starting to break up.

“This is as surprising to me as anybody. I know I’d never do it again. I’m profoundly and eternally remorseful. I’m so sorry,” Hull said.

Saying that he wants “to make a positive out of this horrible thing,” Hull suggested that he could “use my talents to try to help people not make the same mistake I’ve done.”

Hull is a sexual offender under Megan’s law and will have to register for the rest of his life with the state police, Chief Deputy District Attorney David Kaltenbaugh said.

Kaltenbaugh noted that, although Hull was not found to be a sexually violent predator, an assessment determined there “still was a risk of a re-offense.”

He asked for a significant sentence because “counseling without a hammer is meaningless.”

Afterward, the prosecutor appeared to be satisfied with the sentence because it keeps Hull under the court’s supervision for nearly 20 years.

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