I’m a conservative, and I guess I should be writing a column about my great distress resulting from this election. But I’m not going to write that column, because it’s not what I feel.

How delusional can we Americans be? Hardly anything brings out the loony like a heated election, especially when our nation’s tweeter-in-chief stokes the fires with misinformation from the White House.

The final two area teams involved in the PIAA semifinals are both from Bedford with the football and girls soccer teams coming from opposite ends of the spectrum as far as experience goes in this part of the state brackets.

Evangelical Christians have unquestionably been a loyal and largely unmovable base of support for President Donald Trump since he has been in office and in some cases before. Should the election results not be overturned by recounts or court decisions, where do they go and what should they do?

Since becoming editor of The Herald and New Castle News three months ago, I’ve written most of the local editorials and columns appearing in the two papers. I have the scars to prove it. But only one recurring criticism has gotten under my thick skin: When a reader calls an editorial or column “biased,” I want to stand up and scream, “OF COURSE IT’S BIASED — IT’S A (bleep) OPINION!”

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I’m a conservative, and I guess I should be writing a column about my great distress resulting from this election. But I’m not going to write that column, because it’s not what I feel.

How delusional can we Americans be? Hardly anything brings out the loony like a heated election, especially when our nation’s tweeter-in-chief stokes the fires with misinformation from the White House.

The final two area teams involved in the PIAA semifinals are both from Bedford with the football and girls soccer teams coming from opposite ends of the spectrum as far as experience goes in this part of the state brackets.

Evangelical Christians have unquestionably been a loyal and largely unmovable base of support for President Donald Trump since he has been in office and in some cases before. Should the election results not be overturned by recounts or court decisions, where do they go and what should they do?

Since becoming editor of The Herald and New Castle News three months ago, I’ve written most of the local editorials and columns appearing in the two papers. I have the scars to prove it. But only one recurring criticism has gotten under my thick skin: When a reader calls an editorial or column “biased,” I want to stand up and scream, “OF COURSE IT’S BIASED — IT’S A (bleep) OPINION!”

All developed countries have universal national health insurance except the United States. A standard opposition response in our country to this is: “I don’t want the government to take over my health insurance.”  

Our community has suffered through the most divisive national election of recent history. In this moment of intense national bitterness, our community can be a beacon of hope and inspiration to the rest of the country by showing our own healing and unity.   

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Joe Biden described the agonizing wait for the outcome of the presidential election thusly: “Democracy can sometimes be messy.”

I usually avoid discussing politics in my columns, mainly because I would rather not be disowned by family members, unfriended by friends or doused with milkshakes and other beverages by complete strangers at the local Whataburger.

After Michael Penix Jr. threw a well-placed ball to the corner of the end zone into the hands of Hoosiers’ dynamic playmaker Whop Philyor in overtime to trim Indiana’s deficit to one point, it almost seemed a given that Hoosiers’ coach Tom Allen would go for the win rather than be content with an extra point to tie the score.

The Tribune-Democrat has for years committed considerable space and resources each October to supporting the worthy cause of breast cancer awareness, and for the past several years we’ve also touted the efforts related to ovarian cancer in September – working with key partners in local health care and in the business community.

Halloween, like so much else, will be different this year from previous years, but it also offers an analogy that can be applied to the current presidential campaign.

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